Section 518

Where we endeavor to stay positive about the 2011 Mets…

Posts Tagged ‘Ron Darling’

A Look At The Mets Stolen Base Successes (And Failures)

Posted by JD on February 7, 2011

Last week, Sandy Alderson commented that “stolen bases are a footnote”. He’s right, though as James Kannengeiser of Amazin Avenue noted “the Mets have been an elite base stealing machine over the last few seasons.” Actually, Kannengeiser’s analysis thoroughly covers the issue (that’s not the first time I’ve said that about his work) and I pretty much agree with every word of it, especially his conclusion.

But it got me thinking about which Mets players were the most efficient base stealers. So, I went over to Baseball-Reference.com’s Play Index tool to take a deeper dive. Here’s a few highlights of what I found:

  • 60 Mets have a perfect base stealing percentage. 55 of them stole 4 bases or less, including Tom Seaver (4-4), Kelly Stinnett (4-4), Josh Thole (2-2), Sid Fernandez (1-1) and Ron Darling (1-1).
  • The five players who were 5-5 or better: Paul LoDuca (5-5), Shane Spencer (6-6), Dan Norman (8-8), Jason Bay (10-10) and Manny Alexander (11-11).
  • The player with the best “non-perfect” stolen base success rate: Chico Walker, who went 21-22 in 222 games over the 1992-93 seasons. I liked Chico, because his name often reminded me of the immortal Chico Escuela.
  • Shawn Green is the only other Met to exceed a 90% success rate, going 11-12 in 164 games over the 2006-07 seasons. He also owns a very, very expensive house.

Now, let’s look at some arbitrary thresholds (current Mets in bold text):

  • Highest success rates, minimum 25 attempts: Bob Bailor, 40-46 (.870), Carlos Beltran, 97-113 (.858), Roberto Alomar, 22-26 (.846), Kaz Matsui, 22-26 (.846), Cliff Floyd, 32-38 (.842).
  • Lowest success rates, minimum 25 attempts: Elliot Maddox, 6-28 (.214), Ed Kranepool, 15-42 (.357), Jerry Grote, 14-34 (.412), Jeff Kent, 12-28 (.429), Felix Millan, 11-25 (.440).
  • Highest success rates, minimum 50 attempts: Carlos Beltran, 97-113 (.858), Lenny Dykstra, 116-141 (.823), Gregg Jeffries, 63-77 (.818), Luis Castillo, 55-68 (.809), Kevin McReynolds, 67-83 (.807).
  • Lowest success rates, minimum 50 attempts: Joel Youngblood, 39-75 (.520), Wayne Garrett, 33-59 (.559), Rey Ordonez, 28-50 (.560), Bernard Gilkey, 29-50 (.580), Lenny Randle, 47-79 (.595).
  • Highest success rates, minimum 100 attempts: Carlos Beltran, 97-113 (.858), Lenny Dykstra, 116-141 (.823), Jose Reyes, 331-416 (.796), Roger Cedeno, 103-135 (.778), David Wright, 138-180 (.767).
  • Lowest success rates, minimum 100 attempts: John Stearns, 91-142 (.641), Cleon Jones, 91-139 (.655), Tommy Agee, 92-139 (.662), Lee Mazzilli, 152-223 (.682), Frank Taveras, 90-131 (.687).
  • Success rates, minimum 200 stolen bases: Jose Reyes, 331-416 (.796), Howard Johnson, 202-265 (.762), Mookie Wilson, 281-371 (.757), Darryl Strawberry, 191-266 (.718), Lee Mazzilli, 152-223 (.682).

Three observations came to me:

  1. The late 60’s-early 70’s Mets ran a little, but without much success.
  2. The 80’s Mets ran a lot, with a fair amount of success.
  3. The current team has the three most successful runners in franchise history, plus Castillo (.809) and Angel Pagan (55-71, .775).

That final point brings me back to Kannengeiser’s post. I share his confidence in Alderson & Co., but I worry just a bit that this edge will be blunted. Time will tell, but it will most definitely be an interesting sub-plot to follow this season.

Posted in Angel Pagan, Carlos Beltran, David Wright, Jason Bay, Jose Reyes, Luis Castillo, Mets, Sandy Alderson | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Happy Anniversary, Ronnie!

Posted by JD on April 1, 2010

On this date in 1982, the Mets traded fan-favorite and resident hearthrob (and future-former SNY broadcaster) Lee Mazzilli to the Texas Rangers in what is arguably one of the best trades in franchise history. The Mets received two young pitchers in return, Walt Terrell and Ron Darling, both of whom* would go on to play important roles on the 86 and 88 teams.

*I know what you’re thinking, but Terrell was later traded straight-up for Howard Johnson. So he was pretty important, in a round-about way.

Darling would go on to win 99 regular season games and Game 4 of the 86 World Series. Often mediocre during most of his Mets career (101 OPS+ over nine seasons), Darling saved his best performances for that key season, compiling a career best 127 OPS+ and earning a fifth place Cy Young vote. He was traded to the Expos in 1991 for the immortal Tim Burke, but finished the season in Oakland. The following year he appeared in the postseason again as the A’s lost the ALCS to the eventual champion Toronto Blue Jays.

He ended his playing career in Oakland in 1995 and launched his broadcasting career there after a five-year hiatus. Despite a brief foray into the motion picture industry (he appeared in Shallow Hal and The Day After Tomorrow), Darling was back in the booth in 2005, calling Washington Nationals games during their inagural season. Darling returned to New York in 2006, appearing first in SNY’s studio shows but eventually moving into the booth to call games with Gary Cohen and Keith Hernandez (and throwing out the first pitch in Game 7 of the 2006 NLCS).

Ron’s been a part of the Mets family for 18 years now, and it all began on this date in 1982. No foolin’

Posted in Flushing Frivolities, On This Date | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
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